Transgender Equalities Report

Gendered Intelligence statement on Women and Equalities Committee’s Transgender Equality Report

Gendered Intelligence fully welcomes today’s Transgender Equality report published by the House of Commons Women and Equalities Committee and its listed recommendations.

Despite an increase in trans visibility over recent years, we have a long way to go before trans people can feel happy and safe in all aspects of their day-to-day lives.

The report’s aim, to achieve full fairness and equality for trans people across the country, is poignant to many trans people and to organisations such as Gendered Intelligence.

Our work with young trans people gives us an insight into the daily struggles that young trans people face due to widespread prejudice and lack of understanding.

We are hopeful that the report’s strong recommendations in the following areas will bring about lasting change for all trans people.

  1. Recording Names and Gender Identities
  • Its consideration of the needs and recognition of non-binary people, in relation to the amendment of more inclusive language in the Equalities Act
  • The consideration of ‘x’ on passports
  • The removal of gender markers (“non-gendering”) from official records.

These recommendations work to acknowledge that gender is diverse. The practice of having only two gender options available (‘male’ or ‘female’) is no longer fit for purpose in a society where non-binary gender identity proliferates.

  1. Amending the Gender Recognition Act
  • Amendments to the Gender Recognition Act so that trans people can self-declare their gender identity

Currently, the process of applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate can be lengthy, confusing and even humiliating. We welcome a move towards self-determination of gender that ensures full autonomy and dignity for trans people.

  1. Gender Segregated Sport
  • The report highlights the very real discrimination that lies in gender segregated sport

Trans people experience significant barriers to taking part in sport at all levels. These barriers mean that many trans people are not able to enjoy the sense of well-being that can come from participating in sports and related activities.

Gendered Intelligence is currently working in partnership with the FA to improve trans people’s access to football. We hope that the Transgender Equality report will encourage systematic change across all sports.

  1. Experience of young people at school, college and University
  • The much-needed improvement in school, college and University experience of so many trans students

We have a right to feel safe in our learning environments. At the moment there is a lack of centralised guidance to help schools and colleges put equalities legislation into practice for the benefit of trans and gender variant students.

Giving students, and teachers, opportunities to learn about gender diversity is also integral to achieving full equality and fairness.

There continues to be enormous restrictions on all of us when it comes to expressing our gender identity. We need to make the world more intelligent about gender and give children and young people the skills to navigate the complexity of gender.

Reforming trans inclusion in our education system could dismantle gender stereotypes for everyone.

The full report can be read here.

Find out more about our support groups for young trans people: http://genderedintelligence.co.uk/trans-youth/youth-group.

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PSI Review – update from Jay Stewart

I’m aware that some time has passed regarding the review of the Prison Service Instruction and I’m mindful that people are keen to know what’s going on and about next steps. (Here are the terms of reference fyi: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/review-into-the-care-and-management-of-transgender-offenders)

You may know that myself and Peter Dawson from the Prison Reform Trust are independent advisers. Discussion so far has been around building up a contact list of those with whom we need to speak, clarifying what the issues are (as some may be outside our review’s term of reference) and the questions the review team should be asking, as well as devising some ways to hold a meaningful and manageable dialogue exercise.

In the first instance they have set up an email address through which people can contact the review: TransgenderReview@justice.gsi.gov.uk. This e mail address will be routinely monitored and so do feel free to share it or use it for review-related purposes.

If you do e mail you will be asked if you would like to be added to the Review’s database, in case they need to contact you again. This may be a good way of being kept informed.

In addition there will be dates set for possible visits and potential meetings/round-table/discussion events. Do e mail the above if you are interested in attending any of those. Your views and expertise are really welcome. However I imagine places will be limited, although I don’t have that information as yet.

George Barrow, who is the key co-ordinator of the Review, has stated that he is very happy for people to get in touch with him direct if that would be useful for the work in hand.

His details are:

George Barrow

Reducing Reoffending Portfolio | Criminal Justice Policy Group | 4th Flr, 102 Petty France | London | SW1H 9AJ

george.barrow@justice.gsi.gov.uk

In addition some people have already contacted either myself or Peter directly. And we are happy for that to happen. Our time is donated to this review so there is a balance to strike here around limited resources and ensuring that we can move forward on this very important matter.

Kind Regards,

Jay Stewart

Director, Gendered Intelligence