Categories
Uncategorized

World Toilet Day 2019

Everyone should have access to a toilet they are able to use safely.

However, according to Stonewall’s LGBT in Britain trans report – 48% of trans people do not feel comfortable using public toilets.

This means that many trans people, when outside their homes, are faced with a choice of using toilets where they don’t feel safe or welcome, or going home before they need to use the loo. Alternatively, they may not eat or drink all day so they don’t have to go. This situation has a huge impact on how trans, including non-binary people, navigate public space and how comfortable we feel out in the world.

In the UK, we might assume that access to basic sanitation is a given, but a UN statement on the right to sanitation on World Toilet Day reminds us that sanitation goes beyond merely access to a toilet, “Sanitation is not only about constructing toilets or sewerage. It is about understanding people’s needs and finding safe and sustainable solutions that ensure everyone’s dignity.”

It’s important to state that not all trans people have identical needs. While some people would rather use facilities designated male or female, others – particularly non-binary people – would feel far more comfortable with the option of gender-neutral facilities. Individuals whose gender expression does not conform to society’s expectations – whether trans or not – could also benefit from the option of a gender-neutral toilet.

It should go without saying that all men and women should be able to access facilities appropriate to their gender and the Equality Act 2010 gives trans women and trans men the right to do so. Employers and service providers should make sure that all employees, service users and customers are able to access appropriate facilities, without fear of harassment. The Equality Act does not explicitly mention non-binary people. Nonetheless, taking the needs of non-binary people into account is vital if you’re aiming to provide trans inclusive services in general.

The answer is architectural. We believe that a model for all new buildings should be purpose-built, single cubicle facilities that offer privacy and comfort for all, regardless of gender identity or gender expression.

We’re seeing more and more toilets designed as floor-to-ceiling cubicles, like small rooms in themselves, avoiding the potential awkwardness of partially enclosed cubicles that are standard in gendered facilities up and down the country.

However, it’s not always so easy to change older infrastructure to install these unless you’re having a general refurbishment.

A good second option is to make your accessible facilities explicitly gender neutral so that everyone knows it’s OK to use them.  It’s a family-friendly step as well as inclusive of people with non-binary identities and any trans people who may simply feel safer and more comfortable in a non-gendered space.

Doing this is just a matter of re-labelling.  There’s a range of gender neutral toilet signage available on the market, including braille versions.

If you are looking for a short-term solution to labelling or need to create a gender-neutral toilet for an event, you can download our printable toilet signs. We’ve seen them being used across the UK at events!

If you are going to have a refurbishment or new-build, make sure gender neutral facilities are part of the design! Thoughtful design can offer privacy, dignity and safety.

Links to useful resources

Gendered Intelligence Transforming Spaces podcast episode #1 – “Not another talk about toilets!”

Francis Ray White, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Westminster (they/them), Cara English, founder of Open Lavs and Policy Engagement Officer & Research Coordinator at Gendered Intelligence (she/her)  and Irina Korneychuk, FaulknerBrowns Architects (she/her) discuss the context of the fascination around trans people in toilets, and provide some community based and architectural solutions to the toilets challenge

Open Lavs –project mapping gender neutral toilets in the UK

Downloadable all-gender toilet signs from Gendered Intelligence.

Stalled – a US-based advocacy project working on the design, legal and educational barriers to inclusive bathrooms.

Categories
international policy trans rights

Policy Breakthroughs in 2018

2018 was a turbulent year for our community.

We faced challenges from the invigorated far-right but we also saw progress all over the world. It has felt discouraging at points to see a backlash in society after the ‘Trans Tipping Point’ in 2015. Yet we still saw incredible wins in a number of areas. When many loud voices in the media are shouting you down it can be easy to lose sight of the gains we have made as a community. So we’re leaving the negativity in 2018 and going into 2019 looking back at 3 breakthroughs in policy around the world  in the last 12 months:

  1. The Scottish GRA Consultation

Skimming over the media coverage surrounding the Gender Recognition Act Consultation in England and Wales, we’re going to focus on the results from the Scottish equivalent that were released in September. The Scottish Consultation looked at many of the same issues as Westminster’s such as making the process of legal recognition less bureaucratic, lowering the age limit for applications and making the process inclusive of non-binary people. But it was held a few months earlier, closing in March 2018. We haven’t received a detailed report on the consultation but the Scottish Government have released a very encouraging letter with a preliminary evaluation of the responses. Excitingly, a majority of respondents agreed with the Scottish Government’s proposals to demedicalise the process of legal recognition. There was also majority support to lower the age limit so young people aged 16 and 17 can change the gender marker on their birth certificate. Finally, almost two thirds of people were on board with the introduction of legal recognition for non-binary people!

2. The Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Act

Pakistan passed one of the world’s most progressive pieces of legislation relating to trans rights in May. The trans community in Pakistan faces severe levels of discrimination with many people struggling to find employment. The government had previously brought in legal recognition of the khawaja sira, a gender-diverse community who have been part of South Asian society for centuries, with the introduction of an additional sex/gender marker on official documentation. The 2018 Act allows any trans person to not only self-identify under the additional gender marker, but also to self-identify as any gender. It has also established safe houses for trans people and created provisions for physical and mental healthcare for the community.

3. Non-Binary Recognition in the USA

In the face of the Trump administration’s attempted rollback of trans rights, there have been many positive policy changes at state level in the USA. People in Washington, Oregon, Maine, Arkansas and Colorado can now apply for identification documents that recognise people outside of the gender binary. Similar policies will be introduced in Massachusetts and California in 2019. At a federal level, Dana Zzym who brought a case against the Colorado State Government for its refusal to issue a driving license without an M or F marker, won a case against the US State Department with the judge ruling that the department’s refusal to issue a passport a passport without an M or F marker exceeded its authority.

In addition to the above progress in policy seen around the world, we’ve also seen a leap forward in trans representation in the media with trans characters in Supergirl and Emmerdale and the release of Pose featuring 50 trans characters, with the largest cast of trans actors for a TV series and a trans producer!

Our community has continued to see amazing progress in terms of policies, media and culture. We are supported by hundreds of thousands of allies around the world. If you look at all the ground we’ve gained over the last 12 months, there is a lot to be proud of and we can be hopeful looking forward to 2019.

From all of us at Gendered Intelligence, Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

Categories
Uncategorized

Including Trans People in Football – new FA guidance

Over the past year we have worked closely with the Football Association on their new guide to including trans people in football – and we’re delighted to announce that it’s now available online.

The new guidance is based on the FA’s core ethos that ‘Football is for everyone’.

The guide covers:

  • Terminology
  • Laws that protect trans people
  • How to tackle discrimination at your club
  • Making positive steps towards inclusion
  • Issues around ‘fairness of competition’
  • Supporting trans people as managers, players, supporters and other football roles
  • Testimonies from trans people who play, watch and coach football

To accompany the guidance, Gendered Intelligence has produced a short film about trans people playing football. We hope the video will lead to greater understanding for people who play football and are involved in football at semi-professional and grass-roots levels.

This video is about showing you that trans people play football too and we want you to include us in the beautiful game – Jen Kitney, Trans People in Football (film)

Watch the film:

 

Categories
Trans Inquiry trans youth Uncategorized

Gendered Intelligence statement on Women and Equalities Committee’s Transgender Equality Report

Gendered Intelligence fully welcomes today’s Transgender Equality report published by the House of Commons Women and Equalities Committee and its listed recommendations.

Despite an increase in trans visibility over recent years, we have a long way to go before trans people can feel happy and safe in all aspects of their day-to-day lives.

The report’s aim, to achieve full fairness and equality for trans people across the country, is poignant to many trans people and to organisations such as Gendered Intelligence.

Our work with young trans people gives us an insight into the daily struggles that young trans people face due to widespread prejudice and lack of understanding.

We are hopeful that the report’s strong recommendations in the following areas will bring about lasting change for all trans people.

  1. Recording Names and Gender Identities
  • Its consideration of the needs and recognition of non-binary people, in relation to the amendment of more inclusive language in the Equalities Act
  • The consideration of ‘x’ on passports
  • The removal of gender markers (“non-gendering”) from official records.

These recommendations work to acknowledge that gender is diverse. The practice of having only two gender options available (‘male’ or ‘female’) is no longer fit for purpose in a society where non-binary gender identity proliferates.

  1. Amending the Gender Recognition Act
  • Amendments to the Gender Recognition Act so that trans people can self-declare their gender identity

Currently, the process of applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate can be lengthy, confusing and even humiliating. We welcome a move towards self-determination of gender that ensures full autonomy and dignity for trans people.

  1. Gender Segregated Sport
  • The report highlights the very real discrimination that lies in gender segregated sport

Trans people experience significant barriers to taking part in sport at all levels. These barriers mean that many trans people are not able to enjoy the sense of well-being that can come from participating in sports and related activities.

Gendered Intelligence is currently working in partnership with the FA to improve trans people’s access to football. We hope that the Transgender Equality report will encourage systematic change across all sports.

  1. Experience of young people at school, college and University
  • The much-needed improvement in school, college and University experience of so many trans students

We have a right to feel safe in our learning environments. At the moment there is a lack of centralised guidance to help schools and colleges put equalities legislation into practice for the benefit of trans and gender variant students.

Giving students, and teachers, opportunities to learn about gender diversity is also integral to achieving full equality and fairness.

There continues to be enormous restrictions on all of us when it comes to expressing our gender identity. We need to make the world more intelligent about gender and give children and young people the skills to navigate the complexity of gender.

Reforming trans inclusion in our education system could dismantle gender stereotypes for everyone.

The full report can be read here.

Find out more about our support groups for young trans people: http://genderedintelligence.co.uk/trans-youth/youth-group.